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Nrf2 articles
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Registered: 08-09-2017
Posts: 9
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Nrf2 articles have popped up this year. I haven't looked too deep yet. Should I?

https://febs.onlinelibrary.wil...l/10.1111/febs.14379


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5062587/
Picture of ToddAllen
Location: Chicago, IL
Registered: 01-18-2008
Posts: 190
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Yes NRF-1 & NRF-2 are significant players in aging and chronic diseases of aging probably including KD as indicated by the second paper you referenced. These can be manipulated without pharmaceuticals as can most metabolic pathways relevant to KD. Many foods and spices stimulate NRF-2, broccoli sprouts, tumeric, ginger, green tea, cocoa as does fasting, caloric restriction or eating a ketogenic diet. Here's an article on activators of NRF-2 with links to additional articles which explain the role of NRF-2 and its relationship to other metabolic pathways.
http://www.anti-agingfirewalls...s-that-turn-on-nrf2/

This message has been edited. Last edited by: ToddAllen,
Registered: 08-02-2009
Posts: 206
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The second article makes extensive reference to ASC-J9 and ASC-JM17. I mentioned those two compounds in these forums back in 2011, available at this link: http://kennedysdisease.groupee...8121/m/809101002/p/3

The good news from the latest article is that the researchers finally got around to testing ASC-JM17 and found that in counteracts polyglutamine toxicity in both a fruit fly model and a mouse model.

The bad news is they haven't tested ASC-JM17 in humans yet, which is very discouraging. As I mentioned, I wrote about ASC-JM17 in this forum back in 2011, and it required five years from that date to publish the results of testing in a mouse. (If only we could find a researcher who could spell the word urjent, oops I mean urguent, oh never mind.)

Since ASC-JM17 and ASC-J9 are not available to the public, this reopens the question of whether one should consider taking high-absorption curcumin instead of them. That question was thoroughly discussed in the 2011 forum article I mentioned above, so if you are interested, please refer to that. (Of course, you should not take anything unless you discuss it with your doctor.)
Registered: 08-09-2017
Posts: 9
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Thanks. A GP I know is suggesting Avmacol as possibly helpful, citing the articles above. In related news ASC-JM17 work seems to have pointed to the Nrf2 pathway:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26962150
Picture of ToddAllen
Location: Chicago, IL
Registered: 01-18-2008
Posts: 190
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Mickle Spiffy, the Avmacol is interesting but for the money you can get a lot of broccoli seeds. Though I have little idea what might be ideal dosing I've been eating almost daily for a couple years about a tablespoon of broccoli seeds sprouted for 4 to 5 days, yields between 1/2 and a cup of sprouts depending on how far one grows them out.

Here's a place with good prices for larger quantities, 5+ lbs, though one might seek out a small amount elsewhere to test if one likes growing and eating sprouts.
https://foodtolive.com/shop/broccoli-seeds/

This message has been edited. Last edited by: ToddAllen,
Registered: 08-02-2009
Posts: 206
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Avmacol is a brand name for a supplement that contains glucoraphanin and myronsinase. In the body those are converted to sulforaphane.

Here's an article on the role of sulforaphane in protecting against neurodegenerative diseases.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/415078
https://www.hindawi.com/journals/omcl/2013/415078/

In addition to being in the supplement Avmacol, these items are also found in broccoli sprouts. But you'd have to eat a lot of them.

Didn't find any research specific to sulforaphane in KD.
Picture of ToddAllen
Location: Chicago, IL
Registered: 01-18-2008
Posts: 190
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quote:
In addition to being in the supplement Avmacol, these items are also found in broccoli sprouts. But you'd have to eat a lot of them.


Maybe I'm making a mistake, but it looks to me like 5 grams per day of 3 day old broccoli sprouts should more than match a daily serving (2 tablets) of Avmacol.

I'm using this article as my reference for the glucoraphanin content of the sprouts.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC23369/

glucosinolates content of 22.7 μmol/g fr. wt for 3 day old broccoli sprouts
of which roughly 97% are methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates
of which roughly 75% are glucoraphanin which has a molar mass of 437.49 g·mol−1
22.7 * 0.97 * 0.75 * 437.49 = ~7225 ug glucoraphanin/g fresh sprouts

Each tablet of avmacol contains 15 mg of glucoraphanin
15000 / 7225 = ~2.08 grams of 3 day old broccoli sprouts

This message has been edited. Last edited by: ToddAllen,
Picture of ToddAllen
Location: Chicago, IL
Registered: 01-18-2008
Posts: 190
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Forgot to mention previously, anyone increasing their intake of cruciferous veg, broccoli sprouts or taking Avmacol be aware these things may aggravate iodine deficiency or hypothyroidism.
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